Eastern Avenue project brings Lt. Governor Murray to Chelsea

October 27, 2010
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Chelsea residents have 500,000 reasons to give the governor a vote on Election Day.

That’s how much money the Patrick Administration gave to Chelsea to aid in making happen a stunning project on Eastern Avenue that is turning one of the city’s worst half-blocks into a $20 million success story.

When all is said and done at the end of the summer of 2011, 120 apartment units and commercial space for five retail locations will have been brought to life on a slice of land once occupied with a decrepit wooden factory building that had been condemned.

Without the state money from the Patrick Administration, this development would not have happened.

“The governor and I both believe that partnerships are the only way you get business done,” said Lt. Governor Tim Murray.

Murray was the keynote speaker at the early morning ceremony on the site officially noting the project.

The Secretary of transportation Jim Mullins also attended.

City Manager Jay Ash, Representative Gene O’Flaherty, City Council President Leo Robinson and a number of his colleagues in city government attended as well as members of the School Department and the Chamber of Commerce. So too did the developers and bankers who aided in making this project a reality.

The East Boston Savings Bank contributed $15.5 million in financing.

“At one time, the factory on this site was located in such a way that residents could walk from their homes to the factory,” said City Manager Ash. “A factory would never be allowed on this site today as it is across the street from the elementary school and too close to a residential area. This project is our effort at resolving residential development conflicts,” he added.

The mixture of housing and retail will create jobs without contributing to the pollution of the local environment.

Dave Graney, the hard working leader for Synergy Investment and Development, told those assembled under a small tent on the property that the project, known as One Webster, was a difficult one but well worth it.

Lt. Governor Murray agreed.

“Construction people have been put to work. Jobs have been created and permanent jobs will be created for the new businesses that will locate here. This is exactly what we’re trying to do all over the state and I believe the governor has been quite successful at it.”