City Council Recognizes Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month has an even greater significance for the Chelsea City Council this year.

For the first time in its history, nearly half of the body is comprised of women, with five women councillors.

Pictured are Chelsea Councillors Norieliz De Jesus, Judith Garcia, Tanairi Garcia, and Melinda Vega Maldonado. Damali
Vidot was absent from Monday night’s meeting.

On Monday night, those five councillors – Melinda Vega Maldonado, Norieliz De Jesus, Tanairi Garcia, Judith Garcia, and Damali Vidot – introduced a resolution marking Women’s History Month. 

“Among the many abilities and strengths we hold as women, the one I admire the most is the ability to build and shape the future here in Chelsea,” said De Jesus. “I’m not just talking about motherhood, I’m talking about the sisters, I’m talking about the grandmothers, the mentors, the social workers. My whole life, I have been guided by empowering women in Chelsea, from my own mother to my mentor of over 14 years, Gladys Vega.”

De Jesus, who attended Monday night’s meeting while holding her newborn daughter, added that local businesses, organizations, and government agencies need to step up to the plate to help women succeed.

“Let’s not just celebrate women this month, let’s support them as they reenter the workforce,” she said.

Maldonado noted how many women made sacrifices to help the city during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Maldonado also recognized her mother, Gladys Vega, who is the executive director of La Colaborativa.

“She is a tremendous leader and a pillar in the community of Chelsea,” said Maldonado. “She lives and breathes fighting for human rights, thank you for all you do.”

Tanairi Garcia thanked her mother, grandmother, and other family members for their strength and belief.

“Ladies, today we celebrate you,” she said. “If you have a dream, fight, be strong, and go for it. Love the woman you are today, tomorrow, and always.”

Judith Garcia mentioned the many women in Chelsea, past and present, who have helped to make the city a better place.

“I think of all the women to this day who continue to be the economic engine of this community,” she said. “The women who clean the offices in Boston and keep those places running. I think about the women who are dying to continue to serve on our boards and commissions who we barely see and get to recognize because we don’t have to elect them, but they take the time out of their day to serve, and they do it for free, because they want to create a brighter Chelsea.

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