Chelsea Police Department to Co-host Training On Innovative Hub + Cor Public Safety Model

All this week, the Springfield Police Department, Chelsea Police Department and Roca, Inc. have hosted criminal justice policy expert Dale McFee, Deputy Minister of Justice in Saskatchewan Province, Canada, and several of his colleagues, to provide members of each police department, a host of public officials, and members of several community-based agencies three days intensive training in the highly-successful and innovative Hub + COR public safety model.

Hub + COR utilizes a data-driven, social service / law enforcement partnership network to deploy rapid interventions for individuals and families at risk. The Hub + COR model, which has now been replicated throughout Canada, has significantly reduced costly criminal justice interventions, reduced crime by dramatic rates and increased public safety in areas it is used.

McFee, who spent years as both a Police Chief and Deputy Justice Minister, developed this innovative model, while working to prevent crime in his home city of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, a community with historically high rates of crime, violence, drug abuse and incarceration. Mr. McFee comes to Massachusetts as a special guest and friend of Chelsea Police Chief Brian Kyes, Springfield Police Commissioner John Barbieri, and Roca Founder & CEO Molly Baldwin, all three of whom he has worked with over the past year, to help replicate the Hub + COR’s successes in the Commonwealth.

While the Hub + COR training took place between the evening of Monday, March 9 and the afternoon of Wednesday, March 11, CPD, SPD and Roca hosted a very special Hub + COR luncheon event on Tuesday, March 10 for executive-level state officials, elected officials and dignitaries from eastern and western Massachusetts. The luncheon was held at the Residence Inn Hotel. At the event, McFee made extended remarks and provided attendees a substantive overview

On Tuesday, keynote speaker Dale McFee, deputy minister of justice in Saskatchewan Province, Canada, spoke to the large group about a model they have used throughout Canada to help reduce crime and help police be able to focus on true crime while directing others to the proper services.

On Tuesday, keynote speaker Dale McFee, deputy minister of justice in Saskatchewan Province, Canada, spoke to the large group about a model they have used throughout Canada
to help reduce crime and help police be able to focus on true crime while directing others to the proper services.

of the Hub + COR model.

“Some 75 to 80 percent of call to police for service are not criminal in nature,” he said. “A majority of that is for anti-social behavior. Some 25 percent of of them are real in nature. For us, some 5 percent of the 25 percent led to criminal charges. So, 5 percent of what we accomplish has the majority of our resources devoted to trying to solve crime…We can pull 30 to 40 percent of the call out of the queue by redirecting them…This is real. It’s really pulling things right out of the queue…Policing, in my mind, need to get out of the ownership business and into the leadership business. Leadership is about connecting the dots and especially when the resources exist in the community.”

He also said after speaking all over Canada and the United States, that Boston – in particular Chelsea – is the furthest along in the United States in taking this view to combat crime.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.